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The University of the South Pacific
Library
 

Chemistry  

Resources for chemistry students.
Last Updated: Mar 26, 2017 URL: http://usp.ac.fj.libguides.com/chemistry Print Guide RSS Updates

Finding Books Print Page
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Ebook databases

Search through these databases to get access to Ebooks. After you have identified your keywords for your search, you can enter them into the search boxes in the following databases: 

 

Some recent Chemistry books from the Catalogue

Cover Art
The Group 13 Metals Aluminium, Gallium, Indium and Thallium - Simon Aldridge; Anthony J. Downs
Call Number: QD 466 .C445 2011
ISBN: 9780470681916
Publication Date: 2011-05-16

Cover Art
Organic Chemistry - John E. McMurry
Call Number: QD 251 .3 .M365 2011
ISBN: 9780495391449
Publication Date: 2010-01-01

Cover Art
The Art of Problem Solving in Organic Chemistry - Alonso; Miguel E. Alonso-Amelot
Call Number: QD 251 .3 .A46 2014
ISBN: 9781118530214
Publication Date: 2014-08-25

Atkins' physical chemistry - Atkins, P. W. (Peter William)
Call Number: QD 453 .3 .A74 2014
ISBN: 9780199697403
Publication Date: 2014

Cover Art
Chemistry - Martin Silberberg; Patricia Amateis
Call Number: QD 33 .2 .S55 2015
ISBN: 9780073511177
Publication Date: 2014-01-06

 

Google Book Search

 

Using the Catalog

The online catalog is used to find books in the library. You can look for a book by title, author, subject, or keyword. Subject Headings are assigned by the Library of Congress and may not be the same word you would use to describe your topic; if you're unsure of the subject heading for your topic, begin with a keyword search.

Here are some useful subject headings:

Heading:

Chemistry

Broader Terms:

Physical sciences

Narrower Terms:

Agricultural chemistry
Biochemistry
Chemistry, Inorganic
Chemistry, Organic
Chemistry, Physical and theoretical
Chemistry, Technical
Crystallization
Environmental chemistry
Evaporation
Fermentation
Geochemistry
Pharmaceutical chemistry
Pharmacy
Sanitary chemistry
Solution (Chemistry)
Stereochemistry

See Also:

Bases (Chemistry)

headings beginning with the word Chemical


 

Locating Books

Books (and other library materials) are arranged by call number :a unique "address" that tells you where to find a book on the shelf. The call number is pasted on the bottom of the spine of a book.

When you see a book you want in the library catalogue, the call number is at the bottom of the "holdings" information:

 

Call numbers usually include letters and numbers. Notice that the besides the call number for the book, you will also need to note the location and collection where the book is kept. For the above title, you will find copies of this book in the PIMRIS library and in the Laucala library in the Pacific Collection, the Reference collection on level B and the "General" collection (the books you can check out of the library).

Science and technology books (like the one shown above) are on level C of Laucala library. There are signs on the shelves showing you where to find QK 473.

Problems finding a book?  Ask at the Information Desk.

 

Understanding Library of Congress Call Numbers

Each item in the University of the South Pacific Library collection has an identification number, known as a call number. Like an address, this number tells you where an item "lives" in the library. The USP Laucala Library uses the Library of Congress system to assign call numbers to materials on the shelves.

The Library of Congress system uses a combination of letters and numbers to identify each item. A call number usually runs four lines when seen on a label.

The first line contains one or more letters (A, HB, Q, M, TK, etc.). These letters represent the main subject of the item. When books have more than one letter, the single lettered books are first on the shelf (to the left), followed by those with double letters
Example: in the N section, the order would be: N, NA, NB, NC, ND, and so on.

The second line is always a whole number from 1-9,999. If the letters on the first line of the call number are the same, the book with the smaller number on the second line is shelved to the left of the book with the larger number.
Example (on a shelf):

N
64
  
is to the left of 
N
101

The third line is always a decimal point, followed by a letter and a number. Books are shelved alphabetically according to the letter after the decimal point.
Example (on a shelf):

N
64
.H4213
is to the left of 
N
64
.M41

If two books share the same letter after the decimal, the book with the smaller decimal number is shelved to the left of the book with the larger decimal number.
Example (on a shelf):

N
64
.H4213 
is to the left of 
N
64
.H47

Example of these four books on a shelf:

N
64
.H4213
N
64
.H47
N
64
.M41
N
101
 

The fourth line may be a year of publication or volume number, with earlier editions and lower volume numbers shelved to the left of later works and higher volume numbers. The fourth line may be a letter-number combination that functions decimally like the third line, but without the decimal point.

The call number used as an example is for a book in the library's collection, Hegel on the Arts, by Henry Paolucci. Its call number unfolds as follows:

 N        = Fine Arts
 64       = Visual arts, general
.H4213  = a letter and decimal representing the author
197    = year of publication

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